What Fresh Hell Is This?

July 17, 2014

Hey, Can We Get Something Like This In Pennsylvania??

From the Tampa Bay Times:
In an effort to push Gov. Rick Scott into the debate on climate change, 10 prominent Florida scientists on Tuesday asked for an opportunity to explain to him the impact human-induced global warming will have on Florida.

"We note you have been asked several times about how, as governor, you will handle the issue of climate change," the scientists wrote in a two-page letter to Scott. "You responded that you are 'not a scientist.' We are scientists and we would like the opportunity to explain what is at stake for our state."
I mean we have a Governor who's denied the science and we have some very important climate scientists in this state as well.  Why can't something like this happen in our state?

As a reminder this is exactly what Governor Corbett said:
I think everybody is taking a look at this. I think some people believe that it is clearly evident and it’s coming very, very quickly. I think there are others who are equally qualified that disagree with that. It’s a subject of debate.
And that's exactly untrue - especially since we know that 97% of climate scientists endorsed the position that climate science is real and that human beings are causing it.

Weather.com has a copy of the letter sent to Florida's governor.  Here's the text:
Dear Governor Scott:

We respectfully request the opportunity to meet with you to discuss the current and future impact of human-induced global warming on Florida. As scientists, we believe such information is vital given the threat posed by climate change. There is a clear need to develop a state plan to both mitigate and adapt to the threats to Florida's communities, businesses, tourism industry and protect the state's economic well being.

We note you have been asked several times about how, as Governor, you will handle the issue of climate change. You responded that you were "not a scientist." We are scientists and we would like the opportunity to explain what is at stake for our state.

We welcome the chance to present you with the latest climate science. Our hope is this will inform you as you consider Florida's plan for meeting the recently announced carbon pollution standards from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Each state will be called on to implement reductions with Florida's carbon intensity rate reduction target of 38 percent by 2030, from 2012 levels.

When asked about climate change, Florida Gov. Rick Scott's stock response is: I'm not a scientist. Florida scientists say: Let's talk.

We will also respond to any questions you might have regarding the recent National Climate Assessment (NCA) and any adaptation planning decisions you may be considering. That report, as you may be aware, concluded that climate change "is already affecting the American people in far-reaching ways." This includes more frequent and/or intense extreme weather events, more acidic oceans, and rising sea levels. The report further found "unambiguous" evidence that human activities — the burning of fossil fuels, the clearing of forests — are the cause. The NCA also found we are "exceptionally vulnerable to sea level rise, extreme heat events, and decreased water availability" caused by climate change, with "residents in some areas such as Miami Beach [already] experiencing seawater flooding their streets."

In short, Florida is one of the most vulnerable places in the country with respect to climate change, with southeastern Florida of particular concern.

This is not a hypothetical. Thousands of scientists have studied the issue from a variety of angles and disciplines over many decades. Those of us signing this letter have spent hundreds of years combined studying this problem, not from any partisan political perspective, but as scientists — seekers of evidence and explanations. As a result, we feel uniquely qualified to assist you in understanding what's already happening in the climate system so you may make the most effective decisions about what must be done to protect the state, including reducing emissions from fossil fuel burning power plants.

It is crucial for policymakers, such as yourself, to have a full understanding of the current and future threats to Florida. Most importantly, you should have a detailed understanding of the specific climate change impacts already affecting Florida to help you formulate the optimal plans for mitigating future impacts, while simultaneously preparing Florida's communities and businesses for the changes already underway, and almost certain to accelerate in coming years.

We look forward to meeting with you, and await your response.
And while I've not found any instance of Governor Corbett saying "I'm not a scientist" it shouldn't be that difficult to re-write the above letter, change some of the details (like replacing "Florida" with "Pennsylvania" and so on) and sending it to Harrisburg.

For the Governor to state that the science is still "subject of debate" only shows how much he needs to be properly educated on the subject and that's something one or more of Pennsylvania's climate scientists should seek to address.

How 'bout it??

7 comments:

Heir to the Throne said...

Ten Florida scientists who grants mainly rely on global warming/Climate Change research wish to tell you their latest apocalyptic predictions if we do not give the Governemnt more power that are not like the debunked apocalyptic predictions they gave 10 years ago.

Heir to the Throne said...



Of course if you want to see research, we will claim you can't because it is our intellectual property.

Zeus0209 said...

Via this logic then, should any government funded agency recognize any imminent threat, that said threat shall be questioned with incredulity, heckled, and ultimately dismissed, without benefit of analysis?

Heir to the Throne said...

any government funded agency recognize any imminent threat,
That has previously occurred when?
Population Bomb
Ozone hole
Acid Rain
9/11

When is Mann going to release his research?

EdHeath said...

HTTT - based on the grammar and logic of Zeus0209's comment, you are saying that A) a US government agency recognized the "Population Bomb" as an imminent threat B) both the hole in the Ozone layer and Acid Rain were frauds and finally C) that 9/11 did not occur?

Maybe you would like to show us the research that debunked Climate Change ten years ago, and who authored it. Because if you can't show us the research, you are lying when say climate change was debunked ten years ago.

Zeus0209 said...

At the philosophical level, maybe the better question to Heir et.al. is just what IS or ever could be requisite to legitimize a claim of threat? I'm guessing that could only lead to scientific study undertaken only by those separated from any personal gain. Or as I think we as a country have intended to establish, government regulated agencies like NASA, NOAA, etc... But apparently those agencies are too perceived as biased in serving of their own self interests. But the overall point at the end of the day, is that no findings irrespective of their origins, can ever be trusted. Unless it's findings used to explain Benghazi.

Heir to the Throne said...

Ed,
debunked apocalyptic predictions
http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/04/02/the-big-list-of-failed-climate-predictions/

I will take back the 9/11 because you believe Bush/the Government knew about how it was going to happen and could have prevented it in advance due to Bin Ladin Determined To Strike in US President's Daily Brief, August 6, 2001.