Prosecute the torture.

July 25, 2005

Holy Mother of God!

According to two people who attended the meeting, Roberts was asked by Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.) what he would do if the law required a ruling that his church considers immoral. Roberts is a devout Catholic and is married to an ardent pro-life activist. The Catholic Church considers abortion to be a sin, and various church leaders have stated that government officials supporting abortion should be denied religious rites such as communion. (Pope Benedict XVI is often cited as holding this strict view of the merging of a person's faith and public duties).

Renowned for his unflappable style in oral argument, Roberts appeared nonplused and, according to sources in the meeting, answered after a long pause that he would probably have to recuse himself. (Emphasis added.)


Is he kidding? Did the Big Jar of Mayonnaise get too clever by half in attempting to step around the issue?

What questions are left to rule upon? The Catholic Church doesn't just consider questions of birth control, abortion, homosexuality, the death penalty, unjust war, stem cell research, etc., but also issues of poverty, social justice, corporate responsibility as issues of morality.

And as a minor side thought:

Isn't he supposed to base decisions on the FREAKIN' CONSTITUION?!?

I may just need to go lay down with a cold rag on my head.

Don't forget kids: it's their reality -- we only have to live in it.

Ugh!

(Link to article here by way of here.)


3 comments:

Rob said...

What if he were asked to rule on the legality of the war in Iraq, and it was, in fact, Constitutional, but the Roman Catholic church says it's unacceptable?

Both sides would love to cherry-pick their answers. We're in favor of ruling constitutionally when it suits our agenda, and in favor of following one's conscience when that gives us the desired result.

Anonymous said...

The problem here, Rob, is that Iraq (as well as Vietnam and Bosnia) were clearly UNCONSTITUTION -- the Congress has no Constitutional authority to ceed the decision to go to war to the President --

Article I, Section 8, Clause 11: [The Congress shall have Power] To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water;

Article II, Section 2, Clause 1: The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; [emphasis added]

AndrewL said...

That last was mine--don't know why it got posted as anonymous